When looking through the gallery of previous projects undertaken by English Oak Buildings then one feature is often reoccurring – the direct glazing of expanses of glass and large, panoramic windows giving unobstructed views of the scenery beyond. Many people, when imaging their dream build, want natural light to flood into their living quarters. Gone are the days of simply having high, narrow window casings and limited visibility.

But how has a traditional building technique such as timber framing moved on with these contemporary styles? An issue with regards to green oak frames is that they take time to settle. Green oak needs time to fully dry – years in fact – and so how does glass get applied to a moving surface without inherent problems such as ingress of water?

Face applied Direct Glazing is the answer, and is a simple, stylish and effective glazing system that has been developed for more than a decade. Glass units are clamped onto the outside of the frame using dried, seasoned oak cover boards that are not going to warp or move. The oak cover boards are joinery quality, made from re-sawn oak.

Not only does direct glazing allow maximum light through with no water leakage, but it also means that the entirety of the oak frame is visible within. Well, why design a stunning timber building then have it covered up?

One great example is Menkea Wartha in Falmouth. The first three bays of the five-bay frame are open to the roof with a fully glazed gable elevation giving the already extensive living area a cathedral-like quality. Light pours in through the glazed sections of the frame, lending Menkea Wartha a contemporary feel without compromising the traditional character of the build.

What’s more, our direct glazing system is guaranteed for 25 years and, critically, includes the installation as well as the double or triple glazed units.