We’ve touched before on the importance of oak being used in buildings throughout English history. Its sturdy properties, abundance in days before more modern materials, and general beauty mean that some of the oldest structures in England incorporate oak. It’s also commonly seen in churches, manor houses and heritage buildings of historical importance. For example, see St Anne’s church, Lewes, where the nave roof has tie-beams, queen posts and carved raking struts that date from 1538, and the chancel roof retains its medieval tie-beams.

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But over time various problems can naturally occur, such as rotting or degeneration of the timber beams; other areas of the building becoming dangerous and therefore structural reassessment is needed; or an extension needs to be added that should fit in with the original design (especially if this property is a Listed building.)  In these cases, English Oak Buildings are the experts when it comes to renovation, identification of problems, and ensuring that a structure does not fall victim to time.

This was the case with Birdcombe Court, a Grade II listed property that needed help with restoration as well as the addition of a green oak extension that would not jeopardise the historic importance of the building.
Birdcombe court oak conservation

 

We work closely with architects and heritage teams to protect beautiful old buildings, restoring them to their former glory. The fact we use hand-crafted methods, such as Mortise and tenon joints held together with hand made oak pegs, means we can conserve the traditional elements of the design. Whether it be replacing a couple of old beams or a complete renovation of a structure that has fallen victim to time, we realise that each project must be approached with the utmost skill and sensitivity, and this is why we’re ideal candidates for the job.

Are you an architect or heritage expert who would like advice? Contact us today on 01225 789978